Global Medicine

  • David Bangsberg, MD, MPH
    Director, MGH Center for Global Health

    David Bangsberg is the Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health, Professor of Medicine at Harvard School of Medicine, Associate Member of the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Associate Member in the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Visiting Professor at the Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda.

  • HASAN BAZARI, MD
    Director, The Morton N. Swartz, MD Initiative
    Program Director Emeritus, Internal Medicine Residency Program

    Dr. Hasan Bazari attended medical school at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. He completed his internal medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1983 and 1986.

    Dr. Hasan Bazari attended medical school at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. He completed his internal medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1983 and 1986. Following residency, Dr. Bazari completed further training in Nephrology and was then appointed to MGH faculty in 1989. Since 1994 he has been the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital. As program director, he has focused on the role of identity formation in professional training. Specifically, he is interested in how the training environment and culture influence the experience of trainees, with an emphasis on guided reflection leading to mindful practice as an increasingly important part of the training program curriculum. Dr. Bazari was born in India and grew up in Malaysia.

  • Ryan Carroll, MD, MPH
    Program Director, MUST Research Collaboration

    Ryan Carroll, MD, MPH is currently serving as the Program Director for the MGH-MUST Collaborative in Uganda.  He has been working with the CGH-MUST community for the past 4 years as a co-PI with Dr. Juliet Mwanga-Amumpaire at MUST, studying the safety and efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide in children with cerebral malaria.  In addition, his funded technology development team is working with Dr. Data Santorino’s CAMTech team at MUST to develop safe and simple continuous positive airway support for infants and children with respiratory distress.

    Ryan Carroll, MD, MPH is currently serving as the Program Director for the MGH-MUST Collaborative in Uganda.  He has been working with the CGH-MUST community for the past 4 years as a co-PI with Dr. Juliet Mwanga-Amumpaire at MUST, studying the safety and efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide in children with cerebral malaria.  In addition, his funded technology development team is working with Dr. Data Santorino’s CAMTech team at MUST to develop safe and simple continuous positive airway support for infants and children with respiratory distress.

    He is an Assistant in Pediatrics faculty member within the division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at the MassGeneral for Children and an Instructor in Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Carroll received his medical degree from the Medical School for International Health, Israel, in collaboration with Columbia University Health Sciences, and also holds a Master of Public Health in International Health.

  • Marya Cohen, MD, MPH
    Director, Chelsea Partnership/Crimson Care Collaborative at MGH Chelsea

    Dr. Marya Cohen holds a primary care practice at MGH Chelsea Health Center serves a vibrant and diverse academic community where she also precepts MGH residents, including GPC residents.

    Dr. Marya Cohen holds a primary care practice at MGH Chelsea Health Center serves a vibrant and diverse academic community where she also precepts MGH residents, including GPC residents. As director of the Crimson Care Collaborative (CCC), she provides clinical experience in longitudinal primary care for medical school students, while providing excellent health care to diverse patients. Cohen is also a physician-researcher at the John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation at MGH, where she is focused on education, research, and innovation in community health centers, as well as improving patient education/self-management programs. Cohen attended Tufts University School of Medicine, and is a graduate of the MGH Internal Medicine/Primary Care program. She also completed her General Medicine Fellowship at MGH, where she authored several publications and received an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.

  • Katherine Crabtree, MD, MPH
    Resident, Global Primary Care

    Katherine Crabtree received a BA in biological sciences from University of Chicago and first became involved in community health there working for Project Health (now Health Leads) and volunteering at a free clinic in her hometown of Owensboro, KY. These experiences led her to pursue an MPH in epidemiology and biostatistics at UC Berkeley, with a thesis on the relationship between food insecurity and diabetes.

    Katherine Crabtree received a BA in biological sciences from University of Chicago and first became involved in community health there working for Project Health (now Health Leads) and volunteering at a free clinic in her hometown of Owensboro, KY. These experiences led her to pursue an MPH in epidemiology and biostatistics at UC Berkeley, with a thesis on the relationship between food insecurity and diabetes. At Berkeley she worked with vulnerable populations in Oakland as an intern for Alameda County Community Food Bank, experience that informed her choice to attend medical school at UC Davis in Sacramento, where she was a co-director for a student-run clinic serving homeless patients, Willow Clinic and also engaged in issues around refugee health, working with World Relief, a refugee relocation group, and developing a study comparing education around care for Hmong refugees at both UC Davis and in Laos. In the future she hopes to continue to work in community health and engage health care providers in improving care for vulnerable populations.

  • Jana Jarolimova, MD
    Resident, Global Primary Care

    Dr. Jana Jarolimova received her B.S. in molecular biology from Brown University. During her undergraduate studies, she became increasingly interested in issues of local and international health disparities. Jana attended Harvard Medical School, where she continued to learn about socioeconomic barriers to health in Boston and abroad.

    Dr. Jana Jarolimova received her B.S. in molecular biology from Brown University. During her undergraduate studies, she became increasingly interested in issues of local and international health disparities. Jana attended Harvard Medical School, where she continued to learn about socioeconomic barriers to health in Boston and abroad.

    While in medical school, she helped found several student-faculty primary care clinics in the Boston area, worked in rural Mexico studying disparities in women’s access to prenatal care, and worked in rural Uganda on community health worker training and community-based primary healthcare. In her future career, Jana hopes to combine work on primary care innovation in the U.S. with a focus on capacity building and task-shifting in international community health.

  • Jessica Kenney
    Program Manager, Global Primary Care Program

    Jessica Kenney is the Program Manager for the Global Primary Care Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining the Center for Global Health, she provided immigration services to Partners-affiliated hospitals as a Senior Advisor in the International Office, and was an Account Manager for two Boston based marketing agencies, Arnold Worldwide and AMP Agency. 

    Jessica Kenney is the Program Manager for the Global Primary Care Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining the Center for Global Health, she provided immigration services to Partners-affiliated hospitals as a Senior Advisor in the International Office, and was an Account Manager for two Boston based marketing agencies, Arnold Worldwide and AMP Agency. 

    Jessica holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Community Development and Applied Economics from the University of Vermont and a Master of Public Health degree with a concentration in International Health from Boston University.  During her MPH program, she worked as part of a field team in Kenya to evaluate the Community Health Worker component of the Community Health Strategy in partnership with the Ministry of Health, and she also co-created a tablet-based CommCare HQ mHealth application for Companeros Eñ Salud to assist medical residents with the active case finding of chronic disease in Chiapas, Mexico.  Jessica is dedicated improving access to health care globally and promoting international collaboration.

  • Vanessa Bradford Kerry, MD, MPP
    Associate Director, Partnerships and Global Initiatives, MGH Center for Global Health

    A graduate of Yale University, Dr. Bradford Kerry attended Harvard Medical School for her medical degree, and completed her Master of Science in Heath Planning, Policy and Financing at the London Schools of Economics and of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

  • Caitrin Kelly, MD, MPH
    Resident, Internal Medicine/Global Primary Care

    Caitrin Kelly received her BA in Anthropology from Washington University in St Louis. During her undergraduate studies she spent a semester abroad in Kenya studying health, ecology, and anthropology, and volunteered in St Louis doing refugee social work through the International Institute.

    Caitrin Kelly received her BA in Anthropology from Washington University in St Louis. During her undergraduate studies she spent a semester abroad in Kenya studying health, ecology, and anthropology, and volunteered in St Louis doing refugee social work through the International Institute. After college, she spent a year volunteering with an HIV non-profit, and co-founded a community-based organization now known as Development Pamoja. She then pursued an MPH in International Health Epidemiology at the University of Michigan, where her thesis work was with the CDC-Kenya on pandemic influenza vaccine effectiveness among healthcare workers in Kenya. While in medical school at Emory University, she volunteered at student-run clinics for the underserved, and co-founded a student group to educate peers on healthcare reform and Medicaid expansion in Georgia. She also spent four months in Ethiopia studying medical education and the impact of enrollment expansion with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), and also collected data on access to surgical care in Ethiopia with the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery.

  • Katie Kentoffio, MD
    Resident, Internal Medicine/Global Primary Care

    Katie Kentoffio received a B.A. in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University, where she became interested in cultural structures affecting disease interpretation through a thesis project on HIV treatment among practitioners of forms of traditional medicine in India.

    Katie Kentoffio received a B.A. in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University, where she became interested in cultural structures affecting disease interpretation through a thesis project on HIV treatment among practitioners of forms of traditional medicine in India. She then spent time studying the cultural interpretation of major depression in rural Liberia, where she also became involved in the rapid establishment of an acute refugee health program when violence broke out in neighboring Ivory Coast. Katie then went on to attend medical school at Harvard University, were she continue to work on issues related to establishment of high quality, community-centered primary care for rural Liberians. In the future she hopes to continue working on best practices to build effective health systems in underserved and under-resourced rural communities.

  • Julian Mitton, MD
    Resident, Internal Medicine/Global Primary Care

    Dr. Julian Mitton entered medical school with a background and passion for using social activism for novel models of international development. His interests in how individual health affects social and economic development motivated him to attend Stony Brook University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Julian Mitton entered medical school with a background and passion for using social activism for novel models of international development. His interests in how individual health affects social and economic development motivated him to attend Stony Brook University School of Medicine. In medical school, Julian continued his interests in interdisciplinary advocacy. During medical school, Julian served clinically in Peru at the Lamay Health Clinic Summer Program where he also implemented the Community Back Pain Initiative – an occupational therapy program he founded and co-led. Julian also spent a summer working with Inuit populations in the Canadian Nunavut Arctic, his first introduction to the unique American health disparities of native populations. During residency, Julian is motivated to think about ways in which primary health care can be used as a tool of empowerment for the development of traditionally marginalized communities, both locally and abroad.

  • Anthony Muiru, MD
    Resident, Internal Medicine/Global Primary Care

    Dr. Anthony Muiru received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Between his third and fourth years, Muiru returned to his native country Kenya as a Fogarty Scholar where he conducted research with HIV-1 Discordant couples and worked clinically in the national teaching hospital.

    Dr. Anthony Muiru received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Between his third and fourth years, Muiru returned to his native country Kenya as a Fogarty Scholar where he conducted research with HIV-1 Discordant couples and worked clinically in the national teaching hospital. He also provided medical care in Kiambu District Hospital where he had once been a pediatric patient. This experience cemented his lifelong interest in strengthening health care delivery systems in rural Africa. Anthony is also passionate about working with marginalized communities in the US. In his future career, he seeks to combine his interests in improving health systems in Sub-Saharan Africa and providing primary care to low-income families and other underserved U.S. populations.

  • Edgar M Mulogo, BDS, MPH, MSc. (HSM)
    Principal Investigator, MUST-MGH-Bugoye Collaboration) Chair, Department of Community Health, Mbarara University of Science and Technology Senior Lecturer, Department of Community Health, Mbarara University of Science and Technology

    Dr Edgar Mugema Mulogo is a public health specialist with particular interest in health service management and health systems research. 

    Dr Edgar Mugema Mulogo is a public health specialist with particular interest in health service management and health systems research. He has served the Government of Uganda health sector in various capacities for over fifteen years. Prior to working at MUST, Edgar worked at a regional health facility providing health care for rural communities. Since 2001, Edgar has been involved in activities assessing health care equity in order to develop interventions that lead to improved access to health care, particularly for the poor and vulnerable. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization, Edgar has participated in health system performance assessments within the WHO Framework at the sub-national level. He has experience in health information systems databases, health policy development, decentralized health systems, development of partnerships for health, and conceptualization of programs in health services management. Edgar has also worked as a consultant evaluating projects funded by different stakeholders including the following: Ministry of Health, USAID, Uganda AIDS Commission, KfW, World Bank/GOPA, Belgian Technical Cooperation, WHO, and the Population Council.

  • Moses Ntaro, MPH
    Community Health Supervisor, Mbarara University of Science and Technology

    Moses Ntaro is a Public Health Specialist with experience, skills and knowledge in community research and programming. In addition to his role in GPC in Uganda, Moses currently acts as Assistant Coordinator of the Community Based Education Programme for the Faculty of Medicine at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in Mbarara.

    Moses Ntaro is a Public Health Specialist with experience, skills and knowledge in community research and programming. In addition to his role in GPC in Uganda, Moses currently acts as Assistant Coordinator of the Community Based Education Programme for the Faculty of Medicine at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in Mbarara. He also teaches Environmental Health to health professional students at MUST. As an educator, Moses aims to ensure students acquire adequate knowledge and skills to offer primary health care to low resource communities in Uganda. Moses is trained in prevention and control of communicable diseases, hygiene promotion, and management of community directed health interventions. He has participated as a researcher in a number of community intervention studies, and has coordinated a community project called Healthy Child Uganda, a health education initiative aiming to improve survival of children under five through training Village Health Teams. In addition to Healthy Child Uganda, Moses has worked with Village Health Teams on improving child nutritional status, as well as family income generating activities.

  • Kris Olson, MD, MPH
    Associate Director, Education and Technology Innovation, MGH Center for Global Health

    Dr. Kris Olson is a Clinician Educator at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. Since 2006, he has served as the Program Leader of CIMIT's Global Health Initiative directed at developing effective catalyst health technologies...

    Dr. Kris Olson is a Clinician Educator at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. Since 2006, he has served as the Program Leader of CIMIT’s Global Health Initiative directed at developing effective catalyst health technologies for low-income countries. He attended medical school at Vanderbilt University as a Justin Potter Scholar and was a US Fulbright Scholar to Australia where he completed a Masters of Public Health Degree in Epidemiology and International Health.

    Dr. Olson was the first Thomas S. Durant Fellow in Refugee Medicine during which he obtained a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in London before spending most of 2003 working in refugee camps along the Thai-Burmese Border. He has since worked in Darfur, Indonesia, Cambodia, and Ethiopia. He was named as one of the Scientific American Top 10 Honor Roll in June 2009 as an individual who has demonstrated leadership in applying new technologies and biomedical discoveries for the benefit of humanity. In Utne Magazine (November 2009), he was recognized as one of the 50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World.

  • Palka Patel, MD
    Uganda Site Director, Global Primary Care Program

    Palka completed her residency training in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. After her residency, she joined Baylor College of Medicine's Global Health Corps. Through this position she spent a year working with a special program directed through Texas Children's Hospital focusing on the screening and treatment of sickle cell disease in Angola. In this role she worked with team members to expand newborn screening of sickle cell disease from maternities to health centers, trained local physicians and health care providers, and treated children with sickle cell disease in a specialty clinic.

    Palka completed her residency training in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. After her residency, she joined Baylor College of Medicine's Global Health Corps. Through this position she spent a year working with a special program directed through Texas Children's Hospital focusing on the screening and treatment of sickle cell disease in Angola. In this role she worked with team members to expand newborn screening of sickle cell disease from maternities to health centers, trained local physicians and health care providers, and treated children with sickle cell disease in a specialty clinic.

    Palka's ultimate goals are to incorporate global health sustainably with academic medicine into a lifelong career. Her work in Angola has provided a stepping stone of practical international experience, and she joins the MGH-GPC program as Uganda Site Director to continue gaining important experience to help achieve her goals.

  • Shreya Patel, MD, MPH
    Resident, Internal Medicine/Global Primary Care

    Dr. Shreya Patel attended Dartmouth College where she received her B.A. in Biology and Public Policy. This was motivated by her EMT work in the Himalayas, Ecuador, and Nicaragua prior to college. After college, Shreya completed a fellowship in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, assisting in coordinating citywide pediatric HIV screening and treatment programs.

    Dr. Shreya Patel attended Dartmouth College where she received her B.A. in Biology and Public Policy. This was motivated by her EMT work in the Himalayas, Ecuador, and Nicaragua prior to college. After college, Shreya completed a fellowship in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, assisting in coordinating citywide pediatric HIV screening and treatment programs. From this experience, she learned the importance of the interaction of both clinical medicine and public health. Shreya attended medical school at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. During medical school, she also took time to complete her MPH at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. As a medical and public health student, Shreya participated in numerous research opportunities and leadership roles including acting co-chair of the Global Health Forum, a group coordinating the school’s global health efforts. She also participated in a summer anesthesia research fellowship at Oregon Health and Science University. In her career, Shreya hopes to help shape international health policy, particularly surrounding low-cost, high-impact interventions including vaccines, pharmaceuticals, and innovative diagnostics.

  • Geren Stone, MD, DTM&H
    Director, Global Primary Care Program

    Dr. Geren Stone completed his Internal Medicine/Primary Care residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Following residency, Dr. Stone served as Interim Ambulatory Chief Resident at MGH before getting a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.  Dr. Stone then worked with Indiana University as the Medicine Team Liaison for the AMPATH program (Academic Model for the Provision of Healthcare) in Eldoret, Kenya.  In that role, he coordinated the experiences of visiting medical students and residents while also holding teaching and clinical responsibilities as a Visiting Lecturer for Moi University. Moreover, during that time, he worked closely with the leadership of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital to examine various indicators of quality of care on the medical wards and to create systems for continual improvement.

    Dr. Geren Stone completed his Internal Medicine/Primary Care residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Following residency, Dr. Stone served as Interim Ambulatory Chief Resident at MGH before getting a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.  Dr. Stone then worked with Indiana University as the Medicine Team Liaison for the AMPATH program (Academic Model for the Provision of Healthcare) in Eldoret, Kenya.  In that role, he coordinated the experiences of visiting medical students and residents while also holding teaching and clinical responsibilities as a Visiting Lecturer for Moi University. Moreover, during that time, he worked closely with the leadership of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital to examine various indicators of quality of care on the medical wards and to create systems for continual improvement.

    Originally from Atlanta, Dr. Stone received a Bachelor degree in Sociology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He then spent a year working in Tajikistan working with physicians providing training in family medicine and caring for TB patients in the prison system.  After that experience, he returned to earn his Medical Degree from University of Virginia School of Medicine. 

    Ultimately, his interest is engaging disparities and the systems that generate them.  He returned to MGH as the Global Primary Care (GPC) program director with a desire to work and think creatively in building mutually beneficial partnerships locally and globally that train leaders, allow for cutting edge innovation and research, and ultimately impact the health of communities.  Working as a primary care provider for Boston Healthcare for the Homeless, he hopes to model a career engaging vulnerable populations locally and globally.

  • Matthew Tobey, MD
    Ambulatory Chief Resident, MGH Internal Medicine Program

    Dr. Matthew Tobey moved to Boston from upstate New York to study the sciences at Harvard College. He then received his M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine. Matt’s interests have long included medical education and caring for underserved communities.

    Dr. Matthew Tobey moved to Boston from upstate New York to study the sciences at Harvard College. He then received his M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine. Matt’s interests have long included medical education and caring for underserved communities. After graduating from the Global Primary Care Program, he joined MGH as its ambulatory chief resident. He has originated a new fellowship program, the “Rural Health Leadership” fellowship, at MGH planned to begin in July 2016, for which he will serve as Associate Program Director. The fellowship will involve community-based interventions and clinical care in Rosebud, South Dakota, through the Indian Health Service.

  • Atheendar S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD
    Instructor, Division of General Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani earned a Ph.D. in health economics from Yale University and his M.D. at the Washington University School of Medicine. Atheen’s research focuses on the role of health interventions over the lifecourse in driving health and socioeconomic inequality, and his work has been published in leading academic journals.

    Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani earned a Ph.D. in health economics from Yale University and his M.D. at the Washington University School of Medicine. Atheen’s research focuses on the role of health interventions over the lifecourse in driving health and socioeconomic inequality, and his work has been published in leading academic journals. Currently, he is engaged in several projects on the impact of early childhood public health interventions on health, cognition, and economic status later in life in Uganda and the United States, and  the role of behavioral responses in determining the success of HIV prevention programs in South Africa. Through his mentors at the Center for Global Health and the Division of General Internal Medicine, Atheen obtained a career development award from the NIH for the work in Uganda.

  • Jatin Mahesh Vyas, MD, PhD
    Program Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program
    Associate Physician in Medicine

    Jatin Vyas attended the University of Texas in Austin, Texas where he received a BA in Plan II. He completed the Medical Scientist Training Program at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX where he received his PhD in Microbiology and Immunology in the laboratory of Robert R. Rich, MD in 1994 and his MD in 1996. Dr. Vyas completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases in the Partners Combined Program. He served as Chief Resident in Medicine at MGH for 18 months in 2000-2001. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Hidde Ploegh, PhD at the Harvard Medical School and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Jay is on the faculty in the Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine at MGH and divides his time between serving as the Program Director of the Department of Medicine Internal Medicine Residency Program and his NIH-funded laboratory.

    Jatin Vyas attended the University of Texas in Austin, Texas where he received a BA in Plan II. He completed the Medical Scientist Training Program at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX where he received his PhD in Microbiology and Immunology in the laboratory of Robert R. Rich, MD in 1994 and his MD in 1996. Dr. Vyas completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases in the Partners Combined Program. He served as Chief Resident in Medicine at MGH for 18 months in 2000-2001. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Hidde Ploegh, PhD at the Harvard Medical School and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Jay is on the faculty in the Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine at MGH and divides his time between serving as the Program Director of the Department of Medicine Internal Medicine Residency Program and his NIH-funded laboratory. Jay is internationally recognized for his work in fungal immunology, investigating the innate immune response to fungal pathogens. He has applied novel imaging modalities, including optical traps and live cell imaging, to investigate the molecular basis of recognition of pathogenic yeast by immune cells. He has been selected as an Infectious Disease Society of America Fellow. He has also been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation He has an avid interest in cooking.

 

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